Chemotherapy induced nausea and vomiting (CINV)

 

An estimated 1.35 million patients in the US undergo treatment with a chemotherapeutic agent each year.

Each patient goes through multiple cycles of chemotherapy treatment depending on the cancer and chemotherapy agent used. Despite advances in the treatment of cancer, nausea and vomiting continue to be a major side effect for up to 5 days after treatment. 

 AMERICAN SOCIETY OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY (ASCO) GUIDELINES.  j Clin Oncol 35. 2017

AMERICAN SOCIETY OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY (ASCO) GUIDELINES. j Clin Oncol 35. 2017

Chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) is treated in accordance to the degree of risk of emesis triggered by specific chemotherapy agents without antiemetic prophylaxis. This includes:

  • Highly Emetogenic Chemotherapy (HEC; 90% frequency without prophylaxis),
  • Moderately Emetogenic Chemotherapy (MEC; 30-90% frequency),
  • Low (10-30% frequency),
  • and Minimal (<10% frequency).

ChemioCare is targeting HEC and MEC, which accounts for more than 80% of chemotherapy patients. 

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CINV presents in two phases: acute and delayed. Acute CINV occurs within 1-2 hours of chemotherapy, lasting for up to 24 hours. Delayed CINV presents more than 24 hours after chemotherapy treatment and can last up to 5 days. Acute CINV is believed to be well controlled but patients experience detrimental side effects. Delayed CINV continues to present a significant unmet medical need.

At least 50% of patients prescribed HEC regimens and at least 28% of patients prescribed MEC regimens experience delayed nausea and vomiting (Grunberg et al. 2004).